the-foxandthe-bodhi:

Oh wow…

(Source: ferreadomina)

6:03am
Reblogged from thisistheverge
thisistheverge:

Morning boot up

thisistheverge:

Morning boot up

(Source: generic-art)

5:56am
Reblogged from wired

wired:

These creations could pass as concept art for the Tomorrowland section of Disney’s theme parks. 

It’s difficult for anyone to imagine the future. But what if you were largely unfamiliar with the present?

That’s the fascination at the heart of “Commissions for Utopia,” a series of futuristic scenes of North Korea dreamed up by one of the country’s promising young architects. 

MORE.

You know what scares me? Being trapped.

I’m not talking about the kind of claustrophobia that keeps people out of crowded elevators. I’m referring to “career claustrophobia,” a stagnation that stifles even the most promising careers. Surprisingly, this dysfunction is so pervasive today that scarcely anyone notices it.
11:32pm
Reblogged from wilwheaton

choochoobear:

tastefullyoffensive:

If Disney Princesses Were Actually Sloths by Jen Lewis

Previously: Nicolas Cage as Disney Princesses

Give unto me.

shirtoid:

Endless Starry Night by Spiritgreen is $10 + free shipping for a limited time at Shirt.Woot

shirtoid:

Endless Starry Night by Spiritgreen is $10 + free shipping for a limited time at Shirt.Woot

architectureofdoom:

Paaskerk, Zaandam, K.L. Sijmons, 1958. View this on the map

afootballobserver:

Sanfrecce Hiroshima 1-2 Yokohama F-Marinos [J. League] 15/07/2014

Manabu Saito 90’

afootballobserver:

Sanfrecce Hiroshima 1-2 Yokohama F-Marinos [J. League] 15/07/2014

Manabu Saito 90’

10:20pm
Reblogged from thisistheverge

(Source: driftstage)

architectureofdoom:

Berlin Friedrichshain, as submitted by thomschikk

architectureofdoom:

Berlin Friedrichshain, as submitted by

Of course, if Facebook did make the content that users see more positive, should we simply be happy? What would it mean that you’re more likely to see announcements from your friends when they are celebrating a new child or a fun night on the town, but less likely to see their posts when they’re offering depressive missives or angsting over a relationship in shambles? If Alice is happier when she is oblivious to Bob’s pain because Facebook chooses to keep that from her, are we willing to sacrifice Bob’s need for support and validation? This is a hard ethical choice at the crux of any decision of what content to show. And the reality is that Facebook is making these choices every day without oversight, transparency, or informed consent.
monalisaparking:

The best part of this DVD

Sarah (Maslany) is in a desperate race to find her missing daughter, but her scorched earth tactics spark a war with Rachel (Maslany), dividing and imperiling all the clones (Maslany, Maslany, Maslany).

monalisaparking:

The best part of this DVD

Sarah (Maslany) is in a desperate race to find her missing daughter, but her scorched earth tactics spark a war with Rachel (Maslany), dividing and imperiling all the clones (Maslany, Maslany, Maslany).

But these details have been lumped into larger cultural narratives, particularly about women’s rights. To some extent, this is understandable and important. One of the most powerful moments in Ginsburg’s dissent is when she quotes Sandra Day O’Connor in a 1992 case involving Planned Parenthood: “The ability of women to participate equally in the economic and social life of the Nation has been facilitated by their ability to control their reproductive lives.” She also cites a number of critical facts about contraceptive access: Women pay significantly more than men. The cost of an Intrauterine Device, or IUD, is roughly equal to a month of pay for a woman working at minimum wage. Almost a third of women would change their form of birth-control if cost weren’t a factor. In these and other spots throughout her dissent, Ginsburg is undoubtedly correct: Affordable birth-control access is an important economic and public-health issue. 

But even if that’s true, it’s also true that certain religious groups regard some forms of contraceptives as morally wrong. This is where simplistic defenses involving the word “science” are misleading; even if the medical community has come to a rough consensus about the definition of conception, there’s no way that this consensus can entirely displace or satisfy larger philosophical and religious convictions about the nature of life itself. At its deepest level, this controversy is about competing understandings about the “truth” of human existence. This kind of competition has always been part of life in America, and it probably always will be.